LTA Trying To Scam Singaporeans’ Money?

The Park-a-Lot Lite app, developed by local developer NiiDees, has removed its live parking data feature which displayed which carparks had vacant lots, following a notice from the LTA.

via zdnet asia

Park-a-Lot Lite is an iPhone app that was previously able to pull data from the LTA’s website, which then showed Singaporean drivers, through a convenient interface, what parking garages around the city-state had open spots.

However, LTA ordered the developer to disable that function of the app, which more or less killed the app’s usefulness.  It was one of the most popular iPhone apps in Singapore prior to this move.

So, what’s LTA’s reasoning?  Money.  They want more of it.

That said, the LTA is open to licensing the data out, the spokesperson added.

via zdnet asia

LTA says that this data is collected from garage operators to be displayed only on the LTA website. I assume that means they have a contract set up with these garage operators, paying them citizens’ tax money to have this information made available for display on their government website, which is itself also funded by citizens’ tax money.

Now, this offer to license out the data is where I think LTA is trying to pull the wool over people’s eyes in an effort to create a double-taxation. You see, citizens are already paying for this data to be made available to them via the website.

When you think about it that way, you could in fact say that LTA has failed the public and is misusing tax money.  I looked over the LTA and OneMotoring sites briefly and didn’t see any prominent links to this service, and until now I didn’t even realize it was available.  I wonder how many other people in Singapore were in a similar situation?  Doesn’t that mean the revenue that was being used to license that data was being misused by LTA?  Doesn’t that mean they failed to make the data properly available to the public when the public was paying for it?  This is a useful service that was being paid for and that the public obviously wanted easy access to, yet they were denied.  And now they’ve been denied again.

What Park-a-Lot Lite did was package that information into a convenient, easy to use interface that allowed citizens to use data that they were already paying for with their tax money.  There’s really no difference between an iPhone app accessing the data on LTA’s site, and a web browser accessing the data on LTA’s site.  The same amount of data is transferred.  Less actually, since only the data is requested, which puts less strain (not that there was much strain before) on LTA’s web host and any bandwidth limitations it might have.  One could argue that the data was only licensed to be shown on LTA’s website, and I would argue that the App isn’t a website and is merely acting as a window to LTA’s site.  Additionally, I would argue that with the rapidly changing tech scene in Singapore, and with more and more people going mobile, LTA should have taken the initiative to amend their contract to specifically allow for mobile access to the data from their site.

Instead, what’s going on here is that LTA has recognized an opportunity to try to shaft people out of more of their hard earned money by making them pay for something they’ve already paid for and is moving quickly to capitalize on it.

Shameful, and it should be illegal.

26 thoughts on “LTA Trying To Scam Singaporeans’ Money?

  1. The younger generation is no longer pliant though, and given the government's pissing off of the local wage-earning generation, I say they're in for an exciting time come GE. They know it, we all know it, let's see how they handle the situation the closer we get to election time :>

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  2. The younger generation is no longer pliant though, and given the government's pissing off of the local wage-earning generation, I say they're in for an exciting time come GE. They know it, we all know it, let's see how they handle the situation the closer we get to election time :>

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  3. That's probably because protesting here is illegal. The 'Speaker's Corner' is a pathetic substitute. In countries where protesting is allowed under freedom of speech laws people are quick to rally and make their voices heard on important issues. Here, life is too comfortable and 'safe' and the people are willing to give up their civil liberties for it.

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  4. That's probably because protesting here is illegal. The 'Speaker's Corner' is a pathetic substitute. In countries where protesting is allowed under freedom of speech laws people are quick to rally and make their voices heard on important issues. Here, life is too comfortable and 'safe' and the people are willing to give up their civil liberties for it.

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  5. The costs are really stratospheric here though, in part because civil servants haven't hit the treshold of the public's pain level versus some other countries where street protests and tea-bagging is an occurence.

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  6. The costs are really stratospheric here though, in part because civil servants haven't hit the treshold of the public's pain level versus some other countries where street protests and tea-bagging is an occurence.

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  7. Another layer of cost Singaporeans have to deal with…and then they wonder why so many have left for Oz…

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  8. Another layer of cost Singaporeans have to deal with…and then they wonder why so many have left for Oz…

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  9. I've heard a lot of comments about how the government in Singapore runs the country like it's a business, rather than a government that's in place to serve the people. I agree with you. People in Singapore are rather apathetic politically, but it's not their fault. The government has spent 44 years creating this atmosphere. I expect to see a turning point in Singapore's future, when people finally realize they're not being served.

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  10. I've heard a lot of comments about how the government in Singapore runs the country like it's a business, rather than a government that's in place to serve the people. I agree with you. People in Singapore are rather apathetic politically, but it's not their fault. The government has spent 44 years creating this atmosphere. I expect to see a turning point in Singapore's future, when people finally realize they're not being served.

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  11. Brad,this type of gov “scam” in Singapore is a norm rather than exception. To the gov, it has become business as usual for them, and for them it is because Singaporeans have become voiceless and politically apathetic, and knowing that citizens can do nothing about it. This gov can no longer tell the wrong from right as long as its business generates profit.Just look at the HDB's creative accounting, and you know what I mean.

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  12. Brad,this type of gov “scam” in Singapore is a norm rather than exception. To the gov, it has become business as usual for them, and for them it is because Singaporeans have become voiceless and politically apathetic, and knowing that citizens can do nothing about it. This gov can no longer tell the wrong from right as long as its business generates profit.Just look at the HDB's creative accounting, and you know what I mean.

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  13. An enterprising individual or private organization should wrest the monopoly from LTA. Indeed why should the LTA which is providing a public service limit civil initiatives to provide a free service to the people? Would our civil service be green-eyed with envy if someone else were to make use of public data from government websites and create a successful enterprise? (And the government still thinks that it is world-class.)

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  14. An enterprising individual or private organization should wrest the monopoly from LTA. Indeed why should the LTA which is providing a public service limit civil initiatives to provide a free service to the people? Would our civil service be green-eyed with envy if someone else were to make use of public data from government websites and create a successful enterprise? (And the government still thinks that it is world-class.)

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  15. Great blog you have here Brad, very intelligence, good opinions, well thought out post. Props to you sir.

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  16. Great blog you have here Brad, very intelligence, good opinions, well thought out post. Props to you sir.

    Like

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